Blow your mind, but not completely…

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Make the Madness Stop, The Free Design, 1967

Come along, come along…

Follow the way that leads between madness and madness

Flowers on both sides, each side has weeds and gladness and sadness.

 

Whoa, whoa, walk the way of love, eyes open

Fly the skies above with hope and heart and sense

Whoa, whoa, blow your mind but not completely

Make the madness stop.

 

Deplete we must the store of hate immense and grouping, groping nonsense

Pathways are green and black and white and yellow and crimson

Walk on the rainbow flooded by both side’s truths and opinions.

 

Whoa, whoa, walk the way of love, eyes open

Fly the skies above with hope and heart and sense

Whoa, whoa, blow your mind but not completely

Make the madness stop.

 

Deplete we must the store of hate immense and grouping, groping nonsense…

 

Honesty and purity, beauty and sincerity

Doesn’t that sound corny?

Wish that I were corny.

 

Whoa, whoa, walk the way of love, eyes open

Fly the skies above with hope and heart and sense

Whoa, whoa, blow your mind but not completely

Make the madness stop.

 

Deplete we must the store of hate immense and grouping, groping nonsense…

 

Whoa, whoa, walk the way of love, eyes open

Fly the skies above with hope and heart and sense

Whoa, whoa, blow your mind but not completely

Make the madness stop.

 

Words and music: Chris Dedrick and The Free Design, 1967

www.thefreedesign.com

 

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D H Lawrence and the psychedelic Fox

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D H Lawrence’s novella was filmed in 1967 and the artwork for the resulting poster is inspired. I believe it’s the work of Leo and Diane Dillon. (The taglines are however ridiculous…)

The film version updates the setting from 1918 to contemporary 1960s Canada, with some beautiful cinematography of the snowbound landscape and its wintry light and shadow.

Released not long after the code of production came to an end, The Fox was undermined by the reviewers’ focus on the relationship of the two women, which is unbalanced when the grandson of the farm’s former owner returns. Yet contemporary critic Roger Ebert saw it as “filmed with quiet taste and an intuitive knowledge of human nature… Indeed, it is the natural ease of the film that is so appealing… The delicately constructed atmosphere of cold and snow, of early sunsets and chill lingering in the corners, establishes the tone”.

The film has its flaws and is of its time – there are transgression-must-be-punished issues and the independent, strong-willed character March loses her spirit to conformity. But it’s an interesting effort and has a mournfully mellifluous soundtrack by Lalo Schifrin too.

There is an excerpt from Doris Lessing’s introduction to a reprint of Lawrence’s story hereĀ  (beware spoilers). Interestingly, even The Guardian has to call it a ‘smouldering’ story, so times don’t really change…