An Exmoor September

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Exmoor 1

Tangled wood: Horner, one of England’s largest oak forests.

Exmoor 3

Coming down like the wolf on the fold, cohorts gleaming purple and gold…

Exmoor 2

Church of All Saints, Selworthy. A gleaming monument from across the valley, an iced confection when face-to-face.

Exmoor 4

A little too much confection for some, but it’s too pure not to be enjoyed…

Exmoor 5

Exmoor is even more special because the ugly signage frenzy has yet to reach it. Black and white metal-embossed roadsigns abound, as do National Trust signs of the same vintage – beautiful, timeless lettering and craftmanship.

Exmoor 8

Exmoor 7

Or this plaque on a seat at Webbers Post, originally a viewpoint once used by a local huntsman to watch his hounds.

Exmoor 6

Memento Mori in Stoke Pero churchyard, although he didn’t follow his wife so soon, having another 20 years in which to wander free…

Exmoor 9

Now to savour the time-worn signwriter’s art. Make the most of it while it lasts…

Exmoor 10

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2 thoughts on “An Exmoor September

  1. Beautiful! I did a graphic design course once, with an old guy who remembered when all special type was hand-drawn. He asked us to actually draw letter, and it is really hard! Subtle things. These days of photoshop, it is too easy to plonk in text without really appreciating or understanding it.

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